Cameroon High Commission London, Observe Ghost Town as Consortium Leaders go to Court in Yaounde

London Thursday 23rd March, 2017. 

It was meant to be a whole working day for the Cameroon High Commission, which according to its website, is open from 0930-1730 on Mondays to Fridays with the exception of UK and Cameroon Bank Holidays.

As it turned out, Thursday, March 23rd, 2017, was neither a bank holiday in the UK or Cameroon. Rather it was the day Anglophones, both in Cameroon and in the diaspora had agreed to hold a special ‘Ghost Town” in defiance of the decision of the Biya government to continue with the trial of civil society leaders and activists in a military court. Barrister Agbor Balla, Dr. Fontem Neba, Mancho Bibixy, Hon. Chief Justice Ayah Paul Abine, and many other activists were abducted from the English-Speaking regions of Cameroon without adherence to any due process and taken to Yaounde the capital of Cameroon, where they have been remanded in a maximum security prison for over 2 months. Reports from Yaounde state that the case was again adjourned.

Barrister Agbor Balla and Mancho Bibixy Show the World and West Cameroonians that their Spirit cannot be crushed by the Biya Regime's brutality
Barrister Agbor Balla and Mancho Bibixy Show the World and West Cameroonians that their Spirit cannot be crushed by the Biya Regime’s brutality

Activists of West Cameroon Movement for Change and other sympathisers from sister groups in the UK had decided to go to the High Commission of Cameroon as a way of showing solidarity with those arrested and also as a way of observing the ghost towns.

By the time protesters arrived at 1400, they were surprised to find only some members of the  Metropolitan Police outside the High Commission together with some members of the public who turned up for a 1500 appointment to find the doors already closed for the day.

Activists of West Cameroon Movement for Change and other sympathisers from sister groups in the UK had decided to go to the High Commission of Cameroon as a way of showing solidarity with those arrested and also as a way of observing the ghost towns.

By the time protesters arrived at 1400, they were surprised to find only some members of the  Metropolitan Police outside the High Commission together with some members of the public who turned up for a 1500 appointment to find the doors already closed for the day

Sone eye-witnesses who had been there earlier reported that the High Commission had closed its doors at 1400, explaining to people coming for the collection of documents, visas, and passports that this was in response to the planned demonstration there later that afternoon.

The Community Campaigns Officer for WCMC Mr. Collins K. expressed appreciation to the Cameroon High Commission for doing the honourable thing and observing the ghost town as requested. He, therefore, went on to call on those present to end the demonstration at 2200, instead of all-night given that the High Commission’s decision to close early had made it a much successful day than anticipated.

It should be recalled that protesters of WCMC had on a previous occasion spent an entire night outside the High Commission, thereby preventing the acting High Commissioner from going home.

The Chairman of WCMC, Mr. Mykel Takie, in a statement, thanked all the members who made it to the protest. He also extended his gratitude to those who could not, due to other commitments, but sent in their moral support. He further explained that this struggle was not for the faint hearted, and called on all members to know it was a ‘Marathon and not a 100-meter race’.

WCMC is planning a visit to the BBC, where they intend to shame the Broadcasting House for its complicity in the ongoing crisis in Cameroon through its act of silence. Many feel let down by the BBC to whom they are required by British law to pay TV license.

Another protest at the French Embassy to demand a response to an earlier petition submitted is also planned.

Activists Became Uninvited Guests at CommonWealth Day Celebrations in London: Hold Cameroon Diplomats Hostage

London: March 13, 2017; The CommonWealth Day Celebrations lost all the flair and pomp planned for it because of West Cameroon activists who stormed Westminster Abbey where the Queen and all representatives of CommonWealth Countries were present.

Carrying a coffin draped with the Cameroon flag, they chanted demands asking for the liberation of West Cameroon. They declared their willingness to die for the struggle if something was not done to address the situation.

The highlight of the afternoon was when the Cameroon representatives tried to leave the venue before others. Activists chased their car towards the House of Commons. By Divine providence, a red light stopped the Diplomatic car, giving activists the opportunity to catch up and rain more embarrassment on those inside. The London Met Police and the Secret Service could only watch as there was little do to stop the protesters.

Later that evening, as all Commonwealth dignitaries were hoping for an evening of champagne, they were dismayed to turn up at the CommonWealth Secretariat only to find activists waiting with messages for the Biya regime. The then notorious coffin had also taken its place at the CommonWealth Secretariat.

It is worth remembering that this is the third visit to the Commonwealth Secretariat. The first of which saw a petition handed to the Secretary General, Patricia Scotland QC, demanding a suspension of Cameroon and the second during which an official made a vague promise to do something to ameliorate the situation.

The shadow of the protest cast a gloom over the evening dinner as more police officers were called to assist with policing the evening.

The evening reached its peak when the Cameroon representatives could not leave the event while their counterparts were going.

Dispute pleas from the police, protesters insisted that unless they saw the car of the Cameroon Diplomats they were not going to leave the venue.

 

Late in the night, when it was ascertained that the Cameroon representatives had been smuggled out of the venue in the cars of other diplomats… the coffin left its post. BUT with a firm promise to back.

Many of the dignitaries showed interest in understanding the plight of the protesters with some asking for further information and sources from which to find out more.

 

THE STRUGGLE CONTINUES!

An Open Letter to Akwanga Ebenezer by Walter ONEKON ANGWERE

An Open Letter to Akwanga Ebenezer by Walter ONEKON ANGWERE

EDITOR’S NOTE:

As anyone familiar with the current struggle raging in Cameroon will testify, it is not a new problem. It is one that has been raging for many decades. It is a struggle that has consortiumhad its fair share of martyrs and traitors.

However, considering the legitimacy of this struggle, one is apt to wonder why victory has seemed so elusive for so long. If you are among those wondering, look no further than the actions of many who have sought to undermine the great work being done by the Cameroon Anglophone Civil Society Consortium.

It is therefore not surprising that when Ebenezer Akwanga, who prides himself to be a great champion of the struggle and who carries on his body the evidence of the brutality of the Cameroon regime, made a voice message in which he criticised, the

walter
Walter Onekon Angwere

Consortium, some critical thinkers like Walter Onekon did not spare words in telling him how they felt.

Below is the letter Walter wrote to Ebenezer.

Dear Sir,
It is with disappointment that I address you on the verge of the New Year 2017. I have observed that instead of you being for the struggle to liberate the Anglophone Cameroonians from their present predicaments, you seem to be sowing seeds of discord and discouraging the masses. Why this show of egoism? Why do you think that you are more Southern Cameroonian than any other Southern Cameroonian?

It is morally wrong to take credit for what you have not done. Come to think of it: What have you done for this struggle that you want everybody to listen to you? I remember you had a failed strike in the university of Buea in 1997, if I am not mistaken. That failure seems to have frustrated you till date. You need not vent your frustration on us and this does not in any way mean that you have been leading the struggle for years.

Every Southern Cameroonian, be those in the Regime or in the opposition understands that the Anglophones have a problem and just like you, they have been quiet until the lawyers and teachers spoke out, more than two months ago. Have you ever had a rally to educate the people like the lawyers have done this time around? The answer is NO. You wrote a few books while in prison on the ‘Anglophone Palaver’ but that does not mean you are the only one who has written on this issue. Let me quickly remind you that a great part of your book talks about your person and not necessarily the Anglophone problem.

I have observed you very keenly since this current strike started and noted with dismay that you are not happy that people, other than Akwanga could awaken West Cameroonians to stand for their right. That is why you have opted to discredit and insult them. You even went as far as insulting online journalists for informing the population. The reason you give is that independence is better than a Federation. May I remind you that any liberation is a process and all steps (in this case the federation) counts.

You are an epitome of discord and it is my humble advice that you desist from that unpatriotic attitude. It is because there was an SCNC that you formed the SCYL. Unfortunately, you have never paid allegiance to the SCNC. Why this ego? That’s why you insult Mola Litumbe with no remorse. The fact that you never became a pastor of the PCC, or a civil servant of Cameroun does not mean you must become the president of Southern Cameroons to prove a point to your enemies. How dare you insult the Consortium and call its members ‘old fools’? Are you younger than the consortium members and what makes you think West Cameroonians consider you useful? And even after you shun your citizenship and adopted an American citizenship?

Even that Bible that you claim to read should have told you that you may start a cause, but must not necessarily take that cause to the expected end. You will be at peace with yourself if you accept that you no longer have a role in this struggle and enjoy your new citizenship and take care of your health.

Yes! President Agbor-Balla is a Human Rights Activist/lawyer. How does this make him not capable of handling a cause aimed at giving back the people their rights? We have to remember to chew our words before we say them. Yes! Mola Litumbe and Cardinal Tumi are old, but they seem to reason more that you, who is almost 60. You are the one to redirect your anger and be objective in the way you demand serious things. You have failed from the beginning and yet to convince me that you can succeed. You asked us to stay focused but you left the cause and settled in America.

Yes! Litumbe never matched when he was young and you too never did. You have to learn to respect the views of others. You insult the Consortium and the populace of Anglophone Cameroon but forget quickly that it is thanks to them that you are talking today. Worst still, you talk without any concrete plan of actions. I cannot count the number of promises you have made which never took effect. Every day I hear you say “…I am coming soon…” but that soon is taking forever. Are you for real? Don’t you think it is time we rallied all our efforts behind the Consortium?

Yes most of us do not have a resume like you do. But also tell us that a bigger part of your resume for this struggle has been trying to amass wealth (political or economic) for yourself. That is why in Banjul you were interested in La Republique paying you royalties for standing against them. Is that feasible? Stop fooling yourself and bullying Southern Cameroonians.

There is a saying in pidgin English “if you nor touch bitter leaf, your hand nor go bitter”. Your hand is bitter, and your last audio message says this all and it is in your place to prove me and the rest of English Cameroon to the contrary. To do this you must come to Cameroon to lead your struggle and stop posting useless audios and videos on social media that you don’t want the Consortium to be given the mandate to lead.

Thanks for your understanding and cooperation in UNITING THE ANGLOPHONES BEHIND THE CONSORTIUM AND THE CURRENT STRUGGLE.

We are, we can and we must be stronger together.